Computerworld: Digital-Centric Format Signals End of An Era

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Computerworld is becoming a digital-centric news source

I wouldn’t be surprised if the great visionary Patrick J. McGovern, the founder of International Data Group who passed away last March, thought 47 years ago when he created Computerworld — the flagship of his publishing empire — that the publication would be digital-only one day.

Many in the IT, media and public relations communities are learning today that Computerworld will become a digital-centric publication as of Monday, June 23.  While the news is anti-climatic given the publishing industry’s transition to an eventual all-digital world, and of course we have seen a number of other leading IT publications run out of “ink” in recent years (InformationWeek comes to mind) — as well as national newspapers and magazines like the Christian Science Monitor and Newsweek, among so many others — the Computerworld news seems to signal the end of an era.

Computerworld — always front and center

For 25-year veterans of IT public relations like yours truly, and for many of my associates and friends in the industry (you know who you are), filling a brief case with armfuls of trade publications to take home after work and then flipping through their pages in front of the TV was one of the ways we kept up to date on the industry.  And Computerworld was always front and center…in any briefcase.

Admittedly, the IT email news feeds we now subscribe to jam our in boxes several times a day, and night.  You can’t beat being informed in real-time — as the news breaks — no matter where you are or what device you’re using at the time.

With that said, the Computerworld news still stings a bit.  It’s a sentimental thing.  On the other hand, fewer and fewer clients are arguing with their agencies that a print story trumps an online story.  This week’s news about Computerworld puts an exclamation point on that note.

In case you’ve yet to see it, here’s the notice that’s making its way to Computerworld subscribers:

Computerworld letter to subscribers

We wanted to let you know that we are transitioning our editorial delivery of Computerworld to a digital-centric model and are discontinuing the print edition you currently receive. This change takes effect with the June 23rdissue.

Computerworld will continue to be the go-to resource for senior technology leaders. You’ll find an array of powerful resources — as always — at Computerworld.com as well as unique insights and opportunities for peer connections at Computerworld’s events. The editors are also preparing a digital edition of Computerworld that is very similar to our previous print issues. Beginning August 1, Computerworld “Insiders” will receive an email with a digital magazine link once each month. The new digital edition of Computerworld supports touch and is optimized for tablet, desktop and smartphone. Don’t miss an issue, sign up to be an “Insider” for free today.  

The decision to discontinue print reflects the changing dynamics of the media market. To continue to provide the same level of insight into enterprise technology through in-depth articles, best practices and tech news, we want to focus our attention on growth areas and evolve with the market need. This is not a new model for IDG Enterprise, the publisher of Computerworld. Last year Computerworld’s sister brand, Network World, transitioned to a digital-centric model while maintaining its strong editorial voice and mission. This has proven to be very successful with its audience, where they can access a larger portfolio of content on key tech areas. 

Thank you for being a loyal Computerworld reader. Remember, all of the content you have come to rely on, and more, will still be available on Computerworld.com. You are also invited to join the free “Insider” program onComputerworld.com and will have access to Computerworld’s premium content. We look forward to serving you online and seeing you at our live events.

Sincerely,

Scot Finnie
Editor in Chief, Computerworld
sfinnie@computerworld.com

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